Guest

Login
 
Daily BlogWatch ShowsAlex & RickyBOMClassroomsThe ForumContestsFeaturesProjectsQuilt GalleryShoppeHelpMy Account

 
PreviousNext

Sewing machine life expectancy

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby djane » Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:42 pm

Violet wrote:Bernina is an awesome brand of machine but also comes with an huge price point. I checked out the lowest end mechanical - model 1008 - at my local dealer and it came in at $1000. Way to much for the average sewer. The Babylock BL9 came in at $249. The Husqvarna/Viking came in at $199 but not inclined to seriously consider them after what I learned. Will be checking on a Janome and Brother to see about them, compare all models/features/price point and seriously think about getting one as a backup.


Why would you not consider the Babylock BL9 or the Husqvarna/Viking? What models/brand would you consider and why? I am interested because I am considering getting a second machine to take to classes etc as I don't like to bang around my electronic sewing machine.
Image
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
djane
 
Posts: 601
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 11:29 am

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby EditorAnne » Mon Feb 14, 2011 10:43 pm

Violet wrote:Bernina is an awesome brand of machine but also comes with an huge price point. I checked out the lowest end mechanical - model 1008 - at my local dealer and it came in at $1000. Way to much for the average sewer. The Babylock BL9 came in at $249. The Husqvarna/Viking came in at $199 but not inclined to seriously consider them after what I learned. Will be checking on a Janome and Brother to see about them, compare all models/features/price point and seriously think about getting one as a backup.

I believe you get what you pay for. I would never pay less for something of lesser quality.
Image
in Vancouver, Canada
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
EditorAnne
 
Posts: 286
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 4:31 am

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Violet » Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:08 am

I would consider the Baby Lock, Brother, Janome, Bernina (if the price is right). Also would consider the other brands (Pfaff, Singer, Viking) if I could find a good used older model before they were bought out and the quality started to go down. Plan on doing alot of research and talking with local dealers about their repair rates on all models and what they recommend. I certainly won't buy the bottom of the line simply for price. Everything has to line up to spend any money.
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Violet
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby eileenkny » Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:24 am

It's called "planned obsolecsence". DH Mike used to do all the buying and retiring of the computers at the base. It's called life cycling. Computers are obsolescent at about 4 years of age for a business. Makes you wonder what ours at home are, doesn't it? He recently told DD Keri that her laptop is old and it's 5 years old so she's looking for a new one.
Image
from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
eileenkny
 
Posts: 1886
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:57 am
Location: Maybrook, NY

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Violet » Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:46 am

You are right about computers. I worked for years at a national computer chain store and new models came in about every 6 months with the newest upgrades. Of course they cost more for several months, but we had customers who would come in about every 12 months to get the new one. Thank goodness sewing machines (especial mechanical) have a longer life. Wish I was one of those lucky ladies that still had a running machine but no one said life was fair. The good thing is I can afford to get mine repaired. I can also have fun and knowledge researching an inexpensive mechanical machine regardless if I purchase one or not.
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Violet
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Conipur » Tue Feb 15, 2011 12:16 pm

I have a Bernina 840 and a Bernina Record 930 from 1985. Both were purchased used from private owners. I have never had any repairs, just serviced. I used the 930 in my drapery business for 25 years so it has had a lot of use and still sews great.
I suppose at some point in time I also will no longer be able to get parts when needed and I'll need to get something newer. I don't know if I want a computerized machine.
Image
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Conipur
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 9:49 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Violet » Tue Feb 15, 2011 2:05 pm

I have seen several machines that are only slightly electronic and the vendor says they are good options for someone who wants the benefits of more stitches but doesn't want all the other high-end bells and whistles. I have a feeling getting an electronic Bernina is far easier and cheaper to fix since they are designed to last many many years and would need the parts for these older machines. Certainly worth checking out if one's heart is set on a Bernina. My mom has a higher end Bernina and absolutely loves hers. Hopefully she will give me it thru her will. LOL
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Violet
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Lorchen » Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:44 pm

The original question was about the life expectancy of a sewing machine. I would love to ask the bosses of all well-known brands of sewing machines that question and then put a spell on them so that I get honest answers. I wonder if the more complicated a machine is, the more likely it is to fail.

I have never had any problems with a little Frister & Rossman Cub4 (very small, weighs a ton, totally mechanical, no bells and whistles, but excellent stitch quality) from the 1970s, and I'm convinced that machine will still be going strong when I have fallen apart. :)

I expect a computerized machine to last just a long (hopefully), except that the built-in technology may eventually show it's age and we will lust after a machine with the latest fancy stuff. I'm still waiting for a machine to come on the market that will answer my questions, can hold a conversation about art versus traditional quilting, remind my of my friends' birthdays, and provide me with coffee and cookies. :)
From the edge of Sherwood Forest, home of Robin Hood
Image
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Lorchen
 
Posts: 2576
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 5:50 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Sewdreamy » Tue Feb 15, 2011 9:12 pm

Lorchen wrote:I expect a computerized machine to last just a long (hopefully), except that the built-in technology may eventually show it's age and we will lust after a machine with the latest fancy stuff. I'm still waiting for a machine to come on the market that will answer my questions, can hold a conversation about art versus traditional quilting, remind my of my friends' birthdays, and provide me with coffee and cookies. :)


LMAO.gif
Lorchen, you crack me up.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Image
"Neglect not the gift that is within you..." -1 Timothy 4:14
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Sewdreamy
 
Posts: 1611
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2007 6:55 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby makesgeese » Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:30 pm

Lorchen...I've been wanting to say this for awhile, so I'm going to come right out and say it...you are really very funny. You always make me laugh. (A good, old fashioned laugh out loud.) Are there any houses for sale there at the edge of Sherwood Forest? Because I would sure love to be your neighbor.
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
makesgeese
 
Posts: 122
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 12:59 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby EditorAnne » Wed Feb 16, 2011 4:10 am

SueinNH wrote:I am on a Yahoo list for those with older Berninas and this comes up quite often. If I'm recalling correctly, one of the techs on the list has said that someone with electronics and/or computer hardware knowledge could repair these circuit boards pretty easily.
Sue


I thought this sounded interesting, so I ran it past my best friend, who's a brilliant computer pro. He dashed all my hopes.

Apparently you can't repair a mother board, because it's solid state, which means you can't take it apart and replace bits of it. There's just no way to do it. Once it's toast, it's toast. :(

And companies can't stockpile too many of the circuit boards when they build a line of machines, because computer hardware degrades over time EVEN IF IT IS NEVER USED. The insides tarnish and corrode and the boards become inoperable. So even if the sewing machine companies stockpile the computer components, they likely won't work by the time we need them. :(

And even worse (if you can believe it), if I buy an expensive computerized machine when I retire, I can't expect it to last forever even if I rarely use it, because the computer components will deteriorate on their own. :(

Rats. Guess I'll keep buying instruments instead (I'm currently awaiting delivery of a C clarinet from Buffet), and keep sewing on my lovely old mechanical Bernina. At least, for now.
Image
in Vancouver, Canada
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
EditorAnne
 
Posts: 286
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 4:31 am

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby suehenyon » Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:21 pm

I have a Bernina 1230 that is over 17 years old. When the circuit board went dead, I got it replaced (about 3-4 years ago). It cost me around $250. Not bad to keep a great machine working. I would think Pfaff would replace boards, too. I find it bizarre that a dealer would say that a new machine top of the line machine has a life expectancy of 5 years.
Image
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
suehenyon
 
Posts: 1513
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 11:56 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby eileenkny » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:54 pm

I have a Singer 910 from around 1988, a Viking Freesia from around 2002 and a Babylock Quest from 2009. I have more problems with the Quest than either of the others. Every once in a while I get a bug up my butt and I want a new machine. Usually it's when I'm cursing out the Quest. When I spoke to a dealer who does trade-ins I asked how much he'd give me for it and he told me $250 which is a whole lot less than I paid. He said it's been discontinued because it had so many problems. :shock:
Why don't these manufacturers do recalls like the auto makers do? Because what we do is not a necessity, it's a nicety. Nobody would die if a sewing machine stops working. :x
The Freesia is a bottom line computerized with 15 stitches. I LOVE that machine! If I could get an extended table for it, I wouldn't use the Quest at all-I'd let DH Mike use it. :wink:
Image
from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
eileenkny
 
Posts: 1886
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:57 am
Location: Maybrook, NY

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Violet » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:18 pm

Good News!!!!! When the repair guy was dis-assembling my machine to send the circuit board to the European location he found a small sewing needle in an area not easily seen. He said it was against a resistor and that caused the machine to quit working. The best part is I now have my machine home and it only cost me $125 instead of the almost $800 initially quoted. Said if I have further problems the $125 will be applied to getting the circuit board fixed. I am so excited. My husband said let's go get it right now. When I said I wanted to keep the Baby Lock used as a loaner he didn't blink an eye. It was brand spanking new with everything still sealed. A little more than what I wanted to spend but this shop gives free maintenance for life, so only after 2 checkups it pays for itself. Yipee!!!! My baby is back.
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Violet
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:55 pm

Re: Sewing machine life expectancy

Postby Sewdreamy » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:39 pm

Wow! That's great news.
Image
"Neglect not the gift that is within you..." -1 Timothy 4:14
User avatar
View My TQS Profile
Sewdreamy
 
Posts: 1611
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2007 6:55 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Domestic Sewing Machines

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest